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April 16, 2011
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Wagon Top C-16 Concept by gunslinger87 Wagon Top C-16 Concept by gunslinger87
Well fianlly, here's that concept I had mentioned a little while ago for a Wagon Top boilered C-16. It's based/inspired by the early to intermediate C&S B-4-E class locos. I changed out and swapped a few parts here and there to suit my personal taste. Such as the DL&G "Pancake" style smoke stack, the D&RG style headlight and 4 pannel cab, C&S style boiler mounted air tanks, coal boards, and tool boxes.

The engine is for me and my friend's future HOn3 "Cripple Creek & San Juan Central" railroad. I know I could easily build this in On30, but HOn3 will be much more challenging. I'll come up with something though.

Well I hope you like it! COMMENT IF YOU FAVE PLEASE!!!
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:icontrainandclockguy:
Trainandclockguy Featured By Owner May 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
16 inch wheels your gonna get a whole lot of nowhere lol but your not going to be going that far that fast. If i remember you can go 1 mph per inch of the drivers so your may that thing travel would be what 12-14 MPH well it reminds me of some narrow gauge trains that used to run here in on the Heber Valley Railroad. Thus its slow speed because of track and wheel size led to the name Heber creeper. (heber used to be narrow gauge til the 20 or 30s
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:icongunslinger87:
gunslinger87 Featured By Owner May 22, 2014
And also, I had NO idea the Heber Valley was narrow gauge at one point in time!! :o
Are there any photos of it in it's narrow gauge days?
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:icontrainandclockguy:
Trainandclockguy Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
and yes it was narrow gauge and there are photos of it there is a book i believe called the history of the Heber Valley Rail Road in pictures very intresting book with many pictures of it as narrow gauge it was narrow gauge from when it came to heber in 1899 to i think the early 1920's or 1910's cant remeber well if i find a photo i will be sure to send it your way
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:icongunslinger87:
gunslinger87 Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014
Sorry for the really late response.

If you do come across a photo I'll be looking forward to seeing it! Though I'll be trying to dig some up online of the NG Heber Valley online if I can. ;p
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:icontrainandclockguy:
Trainandclockguy Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
trainandclockguy.deviantart.co…
I told you I would find them! Here they are on my page hope you enjoy them! There are going to be more pictures like this I think on this FB page I found heres the link to that.
www.facebook.com/groups/517551…
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:icongunslinger87:
gunslinger87 Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2014
Wow, these are interesting photos. But are you sure it's narrow gauge? :iconfoxwhaplz: 
The equipment all looks like Standard to me. And the locomotive doesn't look like anything the D&RGW would have had for 3ft gauge motive power. Although it does look similar to some of there SG 2-8-0s or 2-8-2s.
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:icontrainandclockguy:
Trainandclockguy Featured By Owner Jul 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Im preaty sure they are if!?! at the least they should be narrow gauge!
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:icongunslinger87:
gunslinger87 Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014
I'm not doubting the railroad started as narrow gauge, but the locomotive and equipment in the photo you linked me are certainly Standard Gauge. 
For me the give away is the spacing of the wheels under the box cars in the background. I've seen many an antique photo of both standard and narrow gauge equipment, so it's with 90% certainty that the photo shows standard gauge equipment. 
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:icongunslinger87:
gunslinger87 Featured By Owner May 22, 2014
These engines had drive wheels either 36 or 37 inches in diameter. The "C-16" designation doesn't refer to the drive wheel diameter, but rather the locomotive's tractive effort.

The "C" stands for the wheel arrangement of the locomotive. C is for Consolidation, designating that this is a 2-8-0. Whereas the "16" represents that the engine has roughly 16,000 pounds of tractive effort. 

This class system is based on the way the D&RGW classed their engines and I find it to be a simple system and easily understood. So I use it a lot on my fictional narrow gauge roads. :)
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:icontrainandclockguy:
Trainandclockguy Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
oh i have always been taught that it goes C-57 (618s class) and the numbers are for the wheel diameter so the shop hands knew what it was. but i guess that was for U.P. so it probably differs between railroad to railroad 
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